Gluten Sensitivity: It Does Exist


gluten sensitivityOne of the most troublesome and frustrating things about experiencing bloating from a gluten sensitivity is that the problem can often go undiagnosed for years. This is partly because up until very recently, the medical world didn’t recognize non-celiac, non-wheat allergy discomfort as a thing. Another reason is that bloating can be caused by a number of dietary issues as well as water gain, dehydration, stress, medication, and illness, and there had not previously been a scientific way to tie it to gluten consumption.

Luckily for sufferers today, the condition is becoming widely recognized. According to the article “Is Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Real?” on WebMD, “Between 0.5 percent and 6 percent of the general population are estimated to have non-celiac wheat sensitivity.” However, Armin Alaedini, a senior researcher and assistant professor of medicine at Columbia University, points out that this is not an exact number as to date, there haven’t been accurate diagnostic tools or studies on the condition.

That said, we may be getting closer to a true diagnostic test as the article continues on to state that “Some people suffer changes within their bodies after eating gluten that are separate and distinct from those that accompany either celiac disease or wheat allergy, researchers report.” In other words, first science has confirmed that gluten sensitivity exists and now is getting closer to isolating the substance that triggers it.

All of that said, for those people who do experience bloating from a gluten sensitivity, the connection may be recognizable once they think about their eating habits and when the discomfort occurs. Even before people began to understand that the illness exists. Sufferers may have also realized that they experience many of the other ailments now linked to the condition:

  • Brain fog
  • Depression
  • Anxiety
  • Heartburn and burping
  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating
  • Diarrhea
  • Constipation
  • Headaches
  • Bone or joint pain
  • Tingling in hands or feet
  • Chronic fatigue

As of today, the best way to avoid a gluten reaction is to remove wheat from your diet. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done as gluten is a commonly used ingredient in many of the foods we eat on a daily basis. So to help you plan gluten-free meals, the Celiac Disease Foundation has compiled a list of sources of gluten and their derivatives to avoid as well as one of foods that are safe to eat. WebMd also offers tips for gluten-free living in this sideshow. Last but not least, many companies are now making gluten-free products to meet the growing demands of consumers looking to avoid gluten for any reason.

Do you want to spice up your own gluten-free diet? Check out the following recipe sites that offer such delicious cuisine that even people who have no gluten reaction will find the meals delightful:

If you think that you or someone you love is suffering from a gluten sensitivity, schedule an appointment at CT Sinus Center for food allergy testing. Our expert physicians will take the time to thoroughly discuss your diet and symptoms before administering diagnostic testing. Although there is no exact test for gluten sensitivity, by process of elimination and dietary counseling, we’ll get you back to feeling and eating healthy in no time.

Call 860-BALLOON to schedule an appointment at one of our four conveniently-located offices.

And for all things allergy– and sinus-related, check out the CT Sinus website and blog.

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