Setting the Record Straight: Deviated Septum


deviated septumThe nasal septum is the bone and cartilage in the middle of your nose. It is what separates your nasal cavities and is responsible for keeping you breathing freely through your nose. However, if the septum is crooked, or deviated, it can hinder your breathing.

According to WebMD, about 80% of people have somewhat of a deviated septum. The good news is that unless the deviation is severe, you probably won’t even notice it. And fortunately, for most people, this is the case. Unfortunately for the others, a seriously crooked septum can result in breathing problems and requires treatment.

How do I know if I require treatment?

Because the symptoms of a deviated septum mirror those of chronic sinusitis and allergies, it’s important to go to a doctor for a proper diagnosis. WebMD lists them as:

What causes a deviated septum?

You may be born with one, or it can come about because of injury. That said, a broken nose doesn’t necessarily lead to a deviated septum.

What’s the treatment for this condition?

To manage your congestion and discomfort, you can reach for the old standbys:

Or, if you are ready to do more than just manage it, you can schedule an appointment at our sister office, Westwood Ear, Nose and Throat for a more permanent solution. Through superior, patient-centered care, our doctors will be able to determine if you have a deviated septum and whether or not you are a candidate for a surgical procedure called septoplasty, which will repair a crooked septum and improve breathing. During these procedures, the doctor will make a small incision in the area of the nose that needs repairing and remove excess bone or cartilage or lessen swelling and blockage in other ways that can widen the breathing space. Sometimes, a rhinoplasty is combined with septoplasty to improve the appearance or crookedness of the nose.

This outpatient procedure is performed under local or general anesthesia and can usually be done within an hour and a half. If you eligible to have it, your doctor will make sure that you are prepared and comfortable every step of the way.

If you think you may be suffering from a deviated septum, make a straight-line path to your phone and call Westwood Ear, Nose and Throat at  (203) 574-5987 today.

With three conveniently-located offices, there is no reason to turn your nose up to finding relief.

For information on all things related to to sinuses and allergies, visit CT Sinus Center’s website and blog.

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