Nasal Polyps


What’s This Lump in My Nose?

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Have you gone to blow your nose recently and felt a lump in your nostril? Or maybe you feel like there is something solid blocking your nasal passage, in addition to the regular congestion. While it is possible for lumps to grow inside your nose, luckily they are usually nothing serious.

There are a few things that may cause the lump:

Acne. Pimples pop up when pores get blocked and oil and dead skin cells build up. Usually pimples appear on your face, but they can appear in your nose too. Other than using acne medication and warm compresses, you can just wait it out for them to go away. Just make sure you don’t pick at them because that can lead to infection.

Folliculitis. Sometimes the hair follicles inside your nose can become inflamed because of bacterial or fungal infection. The most common type of infection is Staphylococcus aureus (staph) and can go away on its own in mild cases. In severe cases, it is usually easily treated with antibiotics. The symptoms of folliculitis, as explained by Mayo Clinic, are:

  • Clusters of small red bumps or white-headed pimples that develop around hair follicles
  • Pus-filled blisters that break open and crust over
  • Red and inflamed skin
  • Itchy or burning skin
  • Tenderness or pain
  • A large swollen bump or mass

Boils. This is another type of bacterial or fungal infection, which manifests as painful bumps that drain pus. Like folliculitis, it is also usually a staph infection that can be cured with some home care. However, if the following symptoms occur, you should see a doctor as, according to Mayo Clinic, they can lead to a serious condition:

  • There are more than one
  • Occurs on your face
  • Worsens rapidly or is extremely painful
  • Causes a fever
  • Is more than 2 inches (5 centimeters) across
  • Hasn’t healed in two weeks
  • Recurs

Nasal Polyps. These are painless tear-drop or grape-shaped growths that are often caused by continuous inflammation brought on by allergies or asthma. Polyps are usually harmless, but can cause uncomfortable symptoms. According to WebMD, “Most people with nasal polyps have a runny nose, sneezing, and postnasal drip. About 75% have problems with their sense of smell.” The site also lists these additional symptoms:

  • Stuffy or blocked nose
  • Sneezing
  • Facial pain
  • Loss of taste
  • Itching around the eyes
  • Infections (from mucus buildup)

Often when people feel a lump anywhere on their body, they ignore it out of fear. A lump in the nose is no exception. However, it really is best to get it checked out, even in mild cases, because it’s better to be safe, and also your doctor can help alleviate any discomfort and possibly prevent it from recurring. In the rare case that the lump is a more serious infection or growth, your doctor can make sure you get the treatment required.

Our expert physicians at Connecticut Sinus Center have a nose for nasal issues and can help you figure out exactly what is causing the lump and how to treat it. When you come in for your appointment, we’ll sit down with you and discuss your symptoms and medical history. Next, we’ll conduct a series of tests, which may include allergy tests and a nasal endoscopy, that tell us exactly what is causing your growth so that we can come up with an individualized treatment plan that is right for you and your lifestyle.

Call 860-BALLOON today and schedule your appointment. With four conveniently-located offices across the state, getting the care is a no(se)-brainer. 
For more information on sinus– and allergy-related conditions and treatments, visit the CT Sinus Center website and blog.

 


Nasal Polyps No More

nasal polypsSometimes, small growths form in the lining of the nose and sinus passages that can block normal drainage and create discomfort. These painless tear-drop or grape-shaped growths are called nasal polyps and are often caused by continuous inflammation brought on by allergies or asthma. The good news is that nasal polyps are almost always non-cancerous and can be easily treated. In fact, small polyps don’t usually have symptoms or need treatment at all.

 

What symptoms would large polyps cause?

According to WebMD, “Most people with nasal polyps have a runny nose, sneezing, and postnasal drip. About 75% have problems with their sense of smell.” The site also lists these additional symptoms:

  • Stuffy or blocked nose
  • Sneezing
  • Facial pain
  • Loss of taste
  • Itching around the eyes
  • Infections (from mucus buildup)

Because these symptoms are so common, it’s best to see a doctor to pinpoint the exact cause of them. Also, why suffer when permanent relief may be just around the corner?

Our expert physicians at Connecticut Sinus Center will not only treat your nasal polyps, but they will also treat what is causing them. And with four conveniently-located offices across the state, getting the care you need is easier than ever.

When you come in for your appointment, we’ll sit down with you and discuss your symptoms and medical history. Next, we’ll conduct a series of tests, including allergy tests and a nasal endoscopy, that tell us exactly what is causing your discomfort so that we can come up with a individualized treatment plan that is right for you and your lifestyle.

Many times, nasal polyps can be treated with a corticosteroid, which will shrink them and open up the airflow. In some cases, endoscopic surgery is necessary. However, this outpatient procedure will have you breathing freely in no time, and the team at CT Sinus Center will have you feeling at ease throughout the entire process.

Once your polyps have been treated, we will work with you to keep them from coming back. As they are often a result of sinus and allergy issues, we’ll help to put a permanent end to those as well, making nasal polyps a thing of your past.

If you suspect you have nasal polyps, stop letting them affect your health. Call 860-Balloon today and schedule an appointment today.

For more information on all things sinus and allergy, visit the CT Sinus website and blog.